Category Archives: Fiber Arts

No sun yet

Bobbin full of single ply Romney/silk yarn

It feels like it’s been forever since we saw the sun.  For a moment or two this morning the sky brightened, but in the end it just led to more clouds.  The temperature feels like it is inching up, though, which is definitely a plus!

2-ply skeins of the Romney/silk

On these gloomy days I have been catching up on herd paperwork, and doing some plying.  I have spun up quite a bit of my backlog, but I hate to ply, so I frequently put that off until I can’t find another empty bobbin to put on the wheel.  I know, silly!

While spinning, I have been listening to Susan Cooper’s Dark is Rising sequence audiobooks, and am on the 2nd one, The Dark is Rising.  I read this and the prequel, Over Sea, Under Stone, many years ago, but am enjoying it again.  I had never read farther into the series, though, so I am looking forward to the others as well.  Susan Cooper is a wonderful author who has written more than just this series, one of my favorites being The Boggart.  I am not a serious fan of heavy duty fantasy, but the battle between The Dark and The Light in many of her books is a timeless theme, and she does it very well, with believable, complex characters.  It also helps that these books take place in some pretty dramatic places, like Cornwall!

Peanut with her morning bottle

Peanut is continuing to do well, staying outside all day with the others, and coming in about dark.  She hasn’t made the transition to a three bottle a day schedule yet, but I think she is close.  She knows where to go when she wants a nap, and plays hard with the others when she wants.  I don’t fear for her safety with the others, but we will wait until after the Mother’s Day rain deluge to leave her out at night.

Oh my, I can see a slice of blue sky in the distance!  Shocking!

 

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Winter returns

Handdyed, handspun cashgora yarn (by a spinner in Tajikistan)
Handdyed, handspun cashgora yarn (by a spinner in Tajikistan)

I can truthfully say we are still waiting for our goat babies.  The spring-like weather is disappearing tonight, and we face some crazy windchills in the next few days, and I am down with the chest flu (milder than it could be if I had not had my flu shot, but it’s punched me up a bit).

And so we hope that we do not have to have babies arrive with 20-40 mph wind gusts, but if we do, we will manage.  I do not use heat lamps, as straw, hay and inquisitive goats all make for a very volatile situation.  We rely on windbreaks, getting babies dry quickly, and getting them fed up with colostrum ASAP (and lots and lots of straw).  And so we continue our sleepless nights, but tonight I have a reprieve and Sam is doing the late night and early morning checks.  Maybe by the end of the day tomorrow I will feel better :*)

Kiwi Pop Studio yarn
Kiwi Pop Studio yarn

In the meantime, I am resting and ogling my NETA Spa purchases, and also my raffle win.  I am totally over the moon with my Tajik handspun/handdyed cashgora yarn from Casey at Port Fiber, my purchases from Cari Balbo/Ridge Pond Herbals, and also my very unexpected skein of yarn from the raffle at the Spa Fashion Show (Kiwi Pop Studio)!  I have to consult Ravelry for a nice project that will make the most of my cashgora yarn, and for my raffle prize, I am beginning to picture it as an accent to a larger shawl project.  Not sure where I will go with that one, it is not one of those skeins that would have called to me all alone, but now that I have it home, I really see the potential of the sparkle and the glitz and color!

Cari Balbo's Ridge Pond Herbals eye balm, hand cream, tallow face cream, and solid bar skin cream
Cari Balbo’s Ridge Pond Herbals eye balm, hand cream, tallow face cream, and solid bar skin cream

It’s all good, and the whole point of the Spa weekend at the end of February is still just as compelling as it was 15 years ago:  it’s a great break during the winter to meet up with fiber friends and just have a great time relaxing, spinning, knitting, crocheting, and generally having a good time, with a lot of laughs.  The spur to keep up the good spirits until the warmth returns late in the spring.  And so it goes.  Nice.  Very nice!

Almost there, I think!

Betsy waiting for breakfast
Betsy waiting for breakfast

I spent a lot of time early last week worrying about being away in Freeport for the NETA Spa event.  Leaving my son to carry on the late night and early morning checks, which we usually split between us, and worrying that Betsy the First Timer might run into a problem.   In the end, mid-afternoon last Thursday, I took off and headed down to Freeport.  (I am one of the Spa event organizers and there was work to be done setting up the vendor areas, and some put-our-head-together meetings as well).  I ended up staying through the Saturday late afternoon fashion show (I am the emcee, so it was something I needed to do if at all possible) and then came on home.  To no babies in progress :*/

Delta's bum
Delta’s bum

Sam and I texted many times every day, and he posted me photos of goat bums galore.  Over thinking these things is tough.  You want to be observant and ready for anything, but then all the little signs you think are significant just turn out to be little bumps in the road, showing progress, but not a predictable finish line.

Eleganza scratches an itch
Eleganza scratches an itch

There are three girls that should be having their babies anytime now.  (Did I really just say that again??!)  Betsy, Delta, and Eleganza.  Eleganza’s udder has blossomed in the past few days, Betsy’s and Delta’s as well, although Eleganza is outpacing the other two in that department.  Delta and Betsy have had totally slack ligament bands at the base of their tails for at least 10 days, so that hasn’t proven to be a help either.

Delta picking through some promising straw
Delta picking through some promising straw

Betsy is so miserable.  The poor thing can barely move her back legs.  You can tell that the baby is pressing on the nerves in her back end and she can only walk in a very stilted manner.  I feel for her and wish that she would get to it, already!

The beginning of every kidding or lambing season always begins this way.  Exhaustion sets in from doing the late and early checks, and eventually we go away and sleep in a little, only to find the little ones out there with mom, clean, fed and dry.  And so it goes!  I think I will get back to my knitting now…

February warm up week

It’s almost unreal.  The temperatures have been very kind to us, although it’s disconcerting when I think that we are in the middle to the end of February, and really it’s not too normal for weather like this (40s approaching 50).  But there is nothing to be done about it, so we are enjoying it!

Feeding frenzy
Feeding frenzy

The animals are enjoying it as well, although the snow is still so deep that their movement is curtailed a bit.  We are watching our girls like hawks, and this afternoon we noticed that Betsy, our yearling, is losing her “mucous plug” today.  So it won’t be long and she will be having her baby.  Hard to tell how long it might be, but I would expect it to be in the next 24 hours, hopefully sooner.

While waiting for babies a few of us have been getting ready for the SPA NETA spin and knit weekend coming up, this weekend!  I am supposed to be heading down to Freeport (Maine) tomorrow so that we can get the ballroom ready for the vendors, as they will be coming in on Friday to set up their wares.  The big kick-off is Friday evening, so we are all getting excited.  It’s a great weekend full of fun and folks we may not see from one end of the year to the other.  And Freeport is full of fiber-loving people everywhere you look (every hotel common area is crammed with knitters, crocheters, and spinners.  Awesome!).

Betsy, a year ago
Betsy, a year ago

So we watch and wait.  I was supposed to go to a dual birthday luncheon tomorrow before heading down to Freeport (a good friend and I have February birthdays), but we shall see how things progress here with our Betsy.  She is a peach, but a first freshener, so we really want to monitor her closely.

More news soon, I hope!

 

Sun-filled winter Saturday

todayIt was a really beautiful day today.  I drove down the driveway this afternoon and sat in the car with the window open, my face to the sun.  And I could feel the luscious heat of it, such contentment.

It got up to the high 30s today so we have had some melting.  But the sun was the real news, and it just never stopped.  A real joy to be outside.  The goats were in and out all day, running back and forth between the greenhouses, and that is about it.  The sum of today was sun and almost warm temperatures.

Edna wants to know what's up!
Edna wants to know what’s up!

The pregnant girls are progressing slowly.  Betsy’s backside looks a little pinker today, and her udder is larger than it was yesterday.  So the late night and early morning checks continue, and we shall see.  At the beginning of every kidding season I agonize over all the little signs, and by the time a few of the girls have kidded we are just in take-it-as-it-comes mode.  The first is always a nail-biter!

Sun on the snow
Sun on the snow

I am going to have to do a little dance next weekend, as it is the yearly NETA Spa Knit and Spin weekend in Freeport, and as I am one of the planners, I am supposed to be there.  So we shall see what happens with the early due girls, and if I am in Freeport and something is happening, I am not very far away, 50 minutes, perhaps.  But still, if I think anything is percolating, I will be here for the duration.   My goatie babies are the most important thing for me.

It’s school break this week, so I get to spend some extra time with my grandson.  We will be having some fun in the next few days, along with picking up a load of hay.  For a good time, it’s here on the farm!

October fiber fun

It’s been quite a month for fiber activities.  It finally cooled down, although the autumn continues to actually be warmer than usual.  Much nicer to work with wool when it’s not humid and hot!

I have had a list of fiber projects as long as my arm for many years.  Some of them on the list are knitting projects, but many more are spinning projects (I am not going into the weaving project list right now, that would be embarrassing!).  And so I have begun to prioritize them.  (Of course, spinning projects turn into knitting or weaving projects in the final analysis…)

Friends Folly Farm singles. I really need to ply these - I need the bobbins for my next project!
Friends Folly Farm singles. I really need to ply these – I need the bobbins for my next project!

First on my spinning list has been to finish a beautiful 50/50 mohair/wool blend from Friends Folly Farm.  Last week I finished spinning up the pound of singles, now it’s in the queue for plying.

Jacob batts on my old Fricke carder
Jacob batts on my old Fricke carder

Second on the spinning list is to card and spin the beautiful Jacob lamb’s fleece that I split with a friend 2 years ago.  As soon as we received it from our friend Debbie at Hearts of the Meadow Farm in West Virginia, I washed it and carefully put it away.  It has been floating around in the back of my mind for quite awhile, and I am very excited to say that I have begun to process it.  (Although, true to form, when I broke out my drum carder, it turned out to be so dirty that it took about a week to finally get it cleaned out.  My husband took it to work and used an industrial grade compressor to blow out all the little bits that were lurking in there for quite a few years.  So that put me back a little on the project).

Shetland fleece on the drying rack
Shetland fleece on the drying rack

Project three in the spinning department is the Shetland fleece that came home with me from NYS&Wool this year.  Yum!  I can hardly wait.  That is definitely #3 in line.

Romney/silk roving
Romney/silk roving

And number 4:  the lovely Romney/silk roving that I brought home from Rhinebeck.  Two pounds of it means that I really need to hunker down and commit to the project, and I feel like that will be a very good mid-winter project.  Particularly if The Polar Vortex returns to darken the doorstep!

Post-Rhinebeck week

Lovely yard behind our AirBnb house
Lovely yard behind our AirBnb house

I am finally able to write about my adventures at the NY Sheep and Wool Show!  Retirement has its benefits, for sure.

Traveling to Rhinebeck, NY, with a lovely group of fiber friends is the highlight of the year.  The Hudson Valley is usually at its peak of fall color; we rent a house, bring lots of lovely food and libations, and just have a great time.  The sheep and wool show is absolutely fantastic as well!  (Not an afterthought and certainly our reason for being there).  We also get to visit with many vendor friends who are there at the show.  Sometimes this is the only visit we get.

View from the porch
View from the porch

This year our AirBnb rental got a little mixed up, and we ended up staying in a different place than usual.  Lovely, large farmhouse, with all the seating and sprawl areas that we could have wanted, and a great kitchen as well.  You never know how those things are going to work out, but it was a great choice.  With the drought in the northeast continuing, we ended up having perfect weather, too.  Sunday was almost too hot!

Shetland fleece on the drying rack
Shetland fleece on the drying rack

Having had a lovely flock of Coopworth and Border Leicester sheep and crosses for many years, I really never need anything at a sheep and wool show (I have tons of roving and yarn left from our crew).  But in the last year or two I have been loving the adventure of trying out wools from different breeds of sheep.  This year I knew that I wanted to find a Shetland fleece, as that is something I have never spun or knit with.

Foster Family Farm yarn
Foster Family Farm yarn

There were a plethora of fleeces to choose from, and I had a difficult time deciding.  I knew I wanted a dark fleece if I could find one, but a reddish-brown one was second on my list as that is a color you don’t find in Coopworth or Border Leicester sheep.  And so I came away with a lovely small fleece, just enough for me to have some fun with, and maybe spin up for a small shawl.  This hogget (or yearling fleece) came from a farm on Cape Cod, Freddy’s Farm Shetlands.  Lovely, very clean fleece.  This one is not a dual-coated Shetland, as many are (Shetlands are considered a “primitive” breed, so they would typically have a hairy outer fleece layer with very soft undercoat.  And you really want to keep those two products separate when spinning!).  So I waited in the long line in the fleece area, got to look at what everyone else around me was buying, and had a great time!

Romney/silk roving
Romney/silk roving

I also found more little treasures at the show:  some beautiful Romney/silk roving, and two skeins of Wensleydale/Romney yarn.  I bought enough of the roving to possibly make myself a sweater or a vest.  The red yarn is for a cowl, Purl Soho’s pattern ‘Cowl with a Twist.’

And so it goes.  Yesterday was so beautiful and warm that I was able to wash the whole Shetland fleece, and it was almost totally dry by dark.  I also plied up some Coopworth grey singles yarn to use for the accent color on the red cowl.  It was a beautiful day all around, and our Rhinebeck weekend was pretty spectacular!

 

And we are off

Spinning
Spinning

Into retirement, which still does not feel like retirement!  It feels like most of my summer breaks, although I am not on a roll trying to fit all the “fun” things into a very short time span, and am enjoying the lovely summer we are actually having in coastal Maine this year.

Lots of milk!
Lots of milk!

I am now into milking, cheesemaking, training pigeons, and spending as much time with our grandson as possible.  We love to swim and go to the beach, so that’s been a lot of fun.  I am trying to get myself into a productive schedule, but have not succeeded yet.  That extra cup of coffee on the back steps, smelling the ocean air, is too powerful to resist.  I have not gotten much done upstairs where I need to get going on organizing the fiber space.  But I have been doing some spinning on a beautiful wool/mohair blend from Friends Folly Farm.  My eczema got really bad toward the end of the schoolyear with all the stress, so I couldn’t handle fiber for awhile.  But my hands are almost all better, and I am trying to get to a little fiber every day.

And so it goes.  Delightful!

 

 

End of the week

Tesser leering at me from in front of the wood stove
Tesser leering at me from in front of the wood stove

And so it goes!  Going, going and gone.  The last moments of my last vacation are upon me.  It has been a good week, quite productive, and if I must do my Puritanical inventory, I did get a lot accomplished.  Not as much as was on my list, but it was good.

It’s funny, but in the last year or so, looking down the barrel of retirement, I have tried to set myself up for all the things that I want to do.  Spinning, knitting, weaving, felting, sewing.  Guernsey goats and lots of cheese and milk.  I have found one of my dream looms (the Bergman), and gotten involved in my dream goat breed, the Golden Guernseys.

My new little companion
My new little companion, a 1953 Featherweight

As far as the sewing goes, I have been planning on doing quite a bit of sewing with Maine Fiberarts, as well as with other friends who are good with fabric and machines.  But I have a 1951 Singer in a cabinet that is heavy as all get-out.  And so I have been searching very off-handedly for a Singer Featherweight for the last 6 months or so.  Unbelievably, I found one on Craig’s List this past week (and it was not priced out of my reach).  My husband and I were able to meet with the very nice lady who was selling it.  We met at Barnes and Noble in Augusta yesterday morning.  What a great little machine!  I am looking forward to many happy hours with her.

 

Checking in

There is definitely something going on!
There is definitely something going on!

This past two weeks have been busy, busy, busy, and in the middle of it all the cold I thought I was getting over, got worse.  Such is life at the end of February and the beginning of March.

Last weekend was a wild one, however.  I had a blast at the NETA Spa Knit and Spin in Freeport.  I help out with the organizational side, so we were over there before the vendors got there to set up at the Hilton Garden, and left as they were leaving on Sunday morning.  Quite a few of the ladies in my spinning group were there, and we all had a great time (knitting, swimming, hanging out, shopping, napping, reading, swimming.  You get the idea!)  The Fashion Show on Saturday evening was great, as always.  People are so darn creative and get so much done from one year to the next that it blows my mind.  It would have been much more enjoyable if I had not lost my voice by Saturday morning, but these things happen (emceeing the fashion show was a challenge!).  Flickr feed photos of the weekend are here.  (More photos will continue to be added).

Battie the licker
Battie the licker

Battie the Golden Guernsey goat is still not looking close to kidding yet.  We have added in a late night check so they will be used to seeing us out there at all times of the day and night, but this is crazy-making.  By the time the kids are born, we will be dragging with exhaustion!  It’s always the way.  A friend who breeds angora goats recommended that we get a baby monitor.  Our setup is almost 300 feet from the house, but I may give it a try.  It won’t replace the visual checks, but it sure would be a help in the wee hours if something gets going.  We shall see.  I can’t wait to welcome those little goaties (or goatie), but I do wish she might wait long enough for the much warmer weather that is forecast for the coming week.  It’s bitter cold with a mind-numbing windchill right now and through tomorrow.  She will do what she will do, but we can hope!

We got home, eventually
We got home, eventually

Then this past Tuesday afternoon my son and I drove up to get a load of hay in the new/used truck.  Everything went well to begin with.  It was the first time I had driven it and I enjoyed being able to get in much more easily than into the old truck .  On the way home down Route 1, however, we had a blowout.  Back tire was just rotted from sitting for a few years.  The men had all examined them before we drove the truck home, but after a little bit of use, I think the tire just breathed its last.  It was quite cold, and sitting in the truck waiting for the flatbed, I definitely got chilled.  But we got home.  The tow truck driver was a great guy, and all is well.  Thank you, AAA!  New tires on the list, maybe for this week.  I hope.

The only other thing that has happened in the past week or so is that I finally got up to the Maine State Employees Retirement people and filled out all my pension paperwork.  It’s official!  As an already retired friend of mine said, it was a little anticlimactic; she felt as though she should have had to sign her name in a huge, leather-bound book with gilt-edged pages.  Just some IRS forms and a few others, and that was that.  The end of a career and the beginning of a new chapter in life.

Can’t wait!