Zach the Ram Lives On!

I finally think that we will have a few days’ break from lambing now. After last Sunday’s early morning twins we had an early flurry… seven lambs so far. 4 rams and 3 ewes.

My happiest moment came early on Tuesday morning when I arrived in the greenhouse at 5 a.m. to do chores and found that our first time mom, Lupine (a white Border Leicester X Coopworth cross) was lying with an enormous, black, wet and slimy ewe lamb behind her. She looked all done in, and hadn’t gotten up yet. I think I just missed the delivery, which was probably a good thing since I think it must have been a doozy. The ewe lamb had bloodshot eyes, which means that she was really tightly squeezed for a long time on her way out. For a 15 pound lamb with tall goofy legs, she got up and going remarkably well. Once I realized that she was going to be o.k., we tried to get her nursing. Jugged and snuggling with her mama, I did all my other chores and got back to find that she still wasn’t nursing yet. It was already an hour and a half after her birth and I was beginning to get anxious… about ready to tube her when we got her onto the teat and full. It’s always a very anxious time for me, since I do have to go off to work and do not like to leave before I know everything is proceeding normally.

I was worried enough about her that when I went off to work I asked our friend Pam from Hatchtown Farm to look in on Lupine and her girl.

Rosie with her milky mouth
Rosie with her milky mouth

She’s a very special ewe: her father is a black Border Leicester ram named Zach that I no longer have (story for another day) and I was afraid that none of the girls he bred would actually have lambs from him. (They were all re-bred by the Coopworth ram). But Lupine came through, with a ewe lamb at that! Phew! We have named her Rosie. And she is gorgeous :* )

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Lambs at Last!

We had a wonderful day over at Hatchtown Farm’s shearing yesterday. It was a disappointing day since the sun never did come out and it was a bit misty, but the barn was dry and full of great people visiting and helping out! Emily the shearer put in a long day and Pam fed us a great meal :* ) And the fleeces are totally gorgeous!

I went home planning to get a really full night’s sleep, but Norma had other plans… it’s always the way! She looked quite uncomfortable at 10 o’clock

Norma warms up!
Norma warms up!

when I checked on her, and John came in after the 1:30 check to tell me that she “had a bag out!” The first signs that labor has progressed to the point of imminent arrivals, a sac of water makes an appearance and kind of hangs there on a ropey cord. Our friend Kali has been excited about the lambing so she joined us in the peanut gallery as well. We began the vigil and Norma did her pacing and her pushing for the better part of an hour.

It’s always very exciting to see two little hooves emerge with a black nose on top, and ordinarily things move along fairly smoothly at this point. Norma worked, and worked, and got nowhere. I really don’t like interfering with this process, but she lay down and appeared to give up so I gave a little inspection and found that both feet were there, but the head was so huge it just wouldn’t go any farther. I made sure the feet were out there and just got the head a little bit forward and she stood up and took care of the rest. It’s always startling to see the head emerging with a tongue lolling out the side, but he did, and arrived with a 13.5 lb. thunk at 2:55!

Norma cleans off her ram
Norma cleans off her ram

Norma went to work again, cleaning him off and pawing him to get up and belly up to the milk bar. He took some time getting onto those 4 long legs, but once he realized what was waiting for him he really got moving.

Norma is a great mother and she really takes time with her lambs. I was convinced that this ram was a single; she was expelling what looked like the beginning of the afterbirth and we all sighed and admired the beautiful silver ram, wished there were twins in the offing (with a ewe included!), dipped his navel in the iodine and prepared to get back to bed. But Norma was becoming frantic with her baby, pushing him to nurse more and more… and then we realized she was having more contractions and she wasn’t delivering the placenta: it was another lamb!

Waiting for the arrival of his sister!
Waiting for the arrival of his sister!

An hour after the ram lamb arrived, she had an 11.5 lb. black ewe lamb. She popped out with a good wail and was up very quickly. Yay Norma! Way to go :* )

We finally got a few hours of sleep, and when I got back out to do chores this morning, this is what I got to enjoy: Norma cuddled up with her babes… both with milky mouths!

The morning after!
The morning after!

Will She, or Won’t She???

It’s amazing me that Norma is still able to get around. She looks like she’s ready to blow! We calculated her due date at the 147-average mark which made her due date this past Wednesday. But she normally has her lambs on about the 150th day. Could be tonight :* ) Think I will head out and put her into the larger jug now.

Norma is on the ragged edge!
Norma is on the ragged edge!

Norma’s babies have dropped in the past 12 hours as we can see on her right side. She has to be close! She keeps flaring her nostrils and grinding her teeth when I stand near her… I think she thinks it’s about time!

She's ready!
She's ready!

Asthma Firestorm

It certainly looks innocent enough:

These two pens caused all the problems!
These two pens caused all the problems!

Lambing pens (we call them “jugs”) with clean straw, just waiting for our sheepy moms to go into labor. Maybe 8′ X 12′ in area.

Last Sunday they didn’t look this nice. It was a beautiful day and I thought that I would just fork out the old straw and poo, and get some lime down and cordon it off for the impending births. It was a warm and breezy day and it felt great to be outside. Lots of good stuff for the compost piles. Everything went well and John joined me to put down the lime. I finished up chores, went inside and showered and settled in for the evening. I guess I had gotten more than my quota of a snootful and a lungful of molds and bad things that day, and never had a clue that I was about to be very unhappy! About 2 a.m. I woke up feeling like I needed some air. The old asthma was giving me a lot of grief. I used my rescue inhaler and went back to bed… but by the next afternoon at work I was really in distress. Ended up at the doctor’s office having a nebulizer treatment and being given the news that my rescue inhaler (which I only use a few times a year) was totally empty. Great! go home and get some rest and drink a lot of fluids.

I figured things would get better by the next day, but three nights of horrendous coughing later, no sleep and very little air exchange, it became obvious that I needed more help. I haven’t been this sick in about 6 years! My asthma has been very well-controlled with daily meds, and Maine’s climate seems to be a great fit for me. So this has been the first time in a long while that I have actually welcomed prednisone. Not kidding. Last night was the first night that I actually slept – for almost 5 hours. Finally! Now we can bring on the lambs :*)

And o.k., you can all shake your fingers at me and ask: Why was I not wearing a dust mask for that task? Sheer stupidity, with not an ounce of forethought!

Ruit Farm Television

I got the sheep header picture a couple of weeks ago one morning before I went in to feed the ewes. They were standing, waiting for their hay and grain, silently and expectantly, and the picture opportunity was too much to pass up! After I cropped it so it would fit, I got this result. Every time I look at this picture I think that it looks like a website for a network t.v. show! All the major players are standing there, mugging for the camera, with a straight face, being very serious :* )  Barnyard CSI?

What a hoot!

Got Milk? Goat Milk :* )

For someone who has never (I mean never) been a milk drinker, I am incredibly happy about milk today. I have always been plagued with some lactose intolerance, but our goat milk doesn’t bother me at all. Not that I am drinking it, just making cheese with it! And after a hiatus of 2 1/2 months, it’s good to be milking again.

Saturday's milk harvest
Saturday's milk harvest

We don’t do things the way most dairy operations do them. We don’t take our goat kids away from their mamas, which means that while they are nursing we have to share the bounty with the babies. Honestly, this is more convenient for me as this allows me to get back into the swing of milking, storing and handling the milk, and making chevre. Since lambing is coming right up any second now, it’s kind of a relief to know that I don’t have to get out at 5 a.m. before work with milk pails in hand yet! That will come when we wean the kids. For now I am just milking in the afternoon and calling it good. And I am playing with goat milk lotion, which is my favorite in the whole world. Hopefully my recipe will work!

Anyone out there that’s doing goat cheese for a living right now is laughing that I am crowing about a gallon of milk for my milking… but I am not doing things on a grand scale and we love what we are doing. It’s fun, and the product is clean and not filled with hormones. It’s a good thing!

No Horns Allowed!

It couldn’t have been a better day! Well, maybe it could have been a few degrees warmer, but the sap is flowing and the sun is shining, and the goat kids are having a blast, and the pregnant ewes are starting to complain a lot! If they can’t be eating, they are complaining that their babies are kicking the daylights out of them. It’s quite a sight!

Thursday afternoon I raced home from work so that I could pick up all the goat kids and take them down to Sea Breeze Farm in Friendship. Brian is a good soul who is willing to do the evil deed of de-horning our babies for us. We do not have the box or the iron and I am not sure that we have enough goat kids in a year to warrant the purchase and learning curve to use them. So we put the babes in the back of the Subaru and rode down. Chloe came with me, and with great care, Brian burned their horn buds.

Pippi plays with her sister Oreo
Pippi plays with her sister Oreo

The worst part of the de-horning is that you can smell the burning hair. Brian shaves the area before applying the iron, but you still get that smell. Minutes after they are back in the car they are snuggling with the other goatie babes and fine. They look a little strange, like Pippi in this picture… a little like they have crop circles engraved on their tiny heads. Horns are so much trouble in a dairy herd, as they can damage their own udders as well as hurt the others. So we have the onerous task each spring, but it also gets us down to Sea Breeze Farm for a nice visit! And in another week, we will all have forgotten this and have moved on to lambing!

Busy Days

What a week it’s been so far!  Things are hopping here at the farm. Monday we began our ritual of letting the mama goats out into the paddock while their babies have some unsupervised playtime late in the day.  They are a hoot, hopping and dancing all around. Salsa and Sock Monkey have not been well pleased, they stay fairly close to the pen and call loudly to their offspring who totally ignore them!  Elf doesn’t hang around, she heads out into the sun to stretch her legs.  The sheep don’t know what to make of it, but they get along pretty well with the goats and are happy to mingle and say hello.

Before we head the moms back into their pen to reunite with their kids, we have begun milking.  Because of the Ectiban treatments I am not keeping any milk yet, even though there is no withdrawal time for milk or for butchering.  I just don’t feel right about it, and the goats’ fiber still shows signs of the stuff.  But the girls need to get with the program and get into the swing and this is a good opportunity for us to really catch up with each other as well. We milk in a greenhouse that is inside the whole paddock structure, but outside of the paddock that the girls are in (kind of like an area surrounded by animal paddocks but separated so I have a place to store things and enough room for the milking stand).  Usually I just have to open the gate and each doe knows whose turn it is, and they come out and jump onto the stand.  It only took two days and they are back into the old routines.  I love those girls!

Sunday and Sun!

My goodness! We are having a sunny day again today! Wow. No Monday morning snow storm. Amazing. Maybe spring really is just around the corner.

We had a lovely day yesterday and were outside until dark, enjoying the warm temperatures and trying to get caught up with extra tasks that might get us ahead before lambing starts next week. Elf is still having trouble with her pen-mates and she went over the green panel yesterday morning. I guess she needed a break. Her boy had a big belly full of milk and we let her stay outside in the sunshine for awhile before corralling her back in. I feel bad for her… if she had twin babies I might let her out with them, but Dove really needs to be with the others, so they need to make their peace with each other.

Round about midday I got down to a task I had been dreading. Our buck, Elvis, had been showing signs of some itchy, dandruffy stuff, and he was starting to nibble at his legs. Upon further investigation, we realized that he has a lice infestation. So after a call to a vet, who told us that everyone, even the sheep, would have it in no time (if they didn’t already have it), we decided that we had to use the Ectiban pour-on. He instructed us to use it even on the kids, which I really had a tough time with, but I do understand that they had already been exposed to it, so we did. Messy, oily stuff! Yuck! It was not too difficult to get the shorn ewes taken care of, but it was tough getting it under the goat fiber onto their backbones. And we need to do it again in 3 weeks. This winter has been hard on everyone!

After that nasty job, I decided to take a page out of our friend Kelly’s book (Kelly of Romney Ridge Farm) and take some time to go down and visit our peninsula’s lighthouse. Kelly and her human kids had stopped by early in the day to visit our “earless” goats, and when they left they were headed down to the lighthouse. I couldn’t stop thinking about that, so Kali, Chloe and I hopped in the car and went down. Took in the sea breeze and chilled out on the rocks with the gulls in the sunshine. It was great! I can’t get enough of the sound of the surf on the rocks and the view of the ocean to the horizon. Fuel for the soul!  It was good.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse in the March sun
Pemaquid Point Lighthouse in the March sun

Goat Jockeying

Four nights in a row. Wow! Real sleep, 7 hours last night, 9 each of the nights before that. Our babies are all doing well. Saturday morning we opened the three jugs (pens) up to each other in the main greenhouse so that the three goatie moms could mingle with their babies.

Elf surveys the options
Elf surveys the options

This is always something of a challenge. When the does have been separated for awhile they need to re-establish their pecking order. Unfortunately, Elf has always been the lowest-of-the-low and she gets picked-on quite a bit. Sock Monkey really took advantage of the situation and got her licks in. But when the divider came out and Salsa joined the crew, she quickly began to put Sock Monkey in her place. She can be hard on Elf as well, though. As the day went by things got better and they are negotiating their space. We have found through the years with our rams that re-introducing them after a separation is safer in a small space than it is in an open paddock. They do not have a chance to run at each other from a long way away and build up speed and break necks or throw each other with powerful body slams. Hopefully these does will work things out, although Elf has never had any goat buddies here. She tends to hang out with Zorro the llama.

The babies are having a blast, even if their moms are being territorial! The two singles had been waiting for the big moment when they would have some playmates :* )

Coopworth Fiber, LaMancha Dairy Goats and Cheese on the Coast of Maine!