Tag Archives: Pippi

Leaving home

Finished twill towels

Time is flying by as usual, and this past week has been a doozy.  My husband had to travel down to NJ to help with some things and his 94 year old father, I have been weaving like a crazy person, and 5 of our 8 babies have moved off to their new homes.

It’s so nice to meet the new families that are taking on our little Guerseys, and I know they are all going to new adventures and great lives.  Most of our Guernseys are unregistered, and almost all the families who are taking them are doing so for the same reasons I choose the goats I do:  their temperament, their size and their nice milky butterfat.

Off to NH

Saffron’s girls went off to New Hampshire with a wonderful young family last weekend.  Little Red and Blue are now called Lucy and Gidget!  Great names for these sweet girls.  (Gidget is the darker red girl whose ear tips were bent from birth, pretty perfect name!).  It sounds like they are settling in well at their new farm.

Eleganza resting in the shade with her boys

Eleganza’s boys have gone off to different farms here in Maine.  They are sweet guys as well, and I know they will have lots of girls to keep them busy in the future!

Pippi’s girl giving me the stare.  Her name is now Poppe!

And the last to leave this week is our sweet little doeling, Pippi the Lamancha’s girl (Pippi is our Herd Queen).  If I could have kept any of the babies from this year it would have been her.  I am really happy, though, that she is going to a wonderful farm in Vermont, to a young family with whom we are acquainted.  She will love her new friends there, some mini Nubians and some Nigerian dwarfs.  Who knows, maybe she can aspire to being the new herd  queen!

And so it goes.  Spring is quickly turning to summer, and we only have three little ones left to move along to new homes.  Things are much quieter already, it will be a real shock when these little ones leave!  And now, on to serious milking and some cheese  :*)

 

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Its getting warmer, finally

Pippi is very protective of her babies!

We are finally having some milder days, and the snow is disappearing nicely.  Not fast enough, but that’s ok!

Sleeping in the creep

Yesterday we let Pippi and her babies out into the general population, and the babies are loving it.  Pippi is on high alert for any other goat who might be thinking about going near her babies, and she is driving us nuts with her attacks on the others with no provocation.  She really needs to take a chill pill, for sure.  The interesting thing about her babies is that they keep going back into the pen they were in, and sleeping under the feeder.  We have made that pen the “creep” for the babies, which means that moms can’t get in, but the babies can (and Peanut, apparently!).

Tomorrow Edna and her babies will be let out of their jug, as soon as the rain that is forecast is over.  On Saturday we are taking the babies to be disbudded.  Ouch.

Fighting over the best spot

Definitely got Saffron’s date of breeding incorrect, so she and Eleganza are still hanging in there.  I am just hoping that Pippi doesn’t pop either of them too hard in her frenzy to keep her babies “safe.”  It’s always something.

Pippi the Lamancha helicopter mom

Pippi, our herd queen, is really on a roll.  She and her babies have the biggest, most luxuious jug in the greenhouse, but she spends her time patrolling the borders of her little kingdom, warning away all callers.  And not just an idle goat peeking over the green panels, no, if anyone, human or goat, should so much as gaze nonchalantly in her direction, she does this:

Poor Edna is in the next jug and her hay feeder is close to the panel that comes between her area and Pippi’s.  I don’t think Pippi is going to get much breakfast eaten if she keeps this up.  It’s extra funny, too, because Edna doesn’t even blink.  She just keeps on eating her hay, totally ignoring the loudest goat on the block.  Yay for Edna!

Sunny day for Pippi’s kids

Pippi’s new brood

It was a gorgeous and warm day out there today.  The clouds appear to be moving in now, I think, and possibly stay for the weekend.  But while it was nice and sunny around midday, Pippi had her twins, a buck and a doe.  They are beautiful half Lamancha/half Guernsey babies.  They both have Lamancha ears, which is to say, not much!  So no eartags for these two cuties.

Tired out after the hard work of being born

Last night it was apparent that Pippi had lost her mucous plug, but nothing more was happening at the 2 AM and the 5 AM checks.  At breakfast, she moved in front of a hay feeder and would not let anyone else near it.  She staked out her claim for that sheltered little spot in the sun.  When Pippi gets serious about something, she really gets serious!  Every time we went up to check on her, she gave us a growly earful and kept poking her head out at us like aa angry goose.  Clearly telling us to Get Lost.  At 1 PM she really looked ready, but again, she gave us the bum’s rush, and it might have been my imagination, but it looked like she was holding herself so tightly under control that she wouldn’t have a contraction in front of us.  And then she must have popped that first baby out minutes after we left, because when we got back up there at 2:15, they were both up, and the little doeling had a big old milky mouth, and she was almost dry.  Her larger brother was still quite damp and having some trouble getting to the milk bar, which we helped remedy.

Battie, feeling better, but wanting to get up close and personal with Pippi’s babies. :*(

It’s a huge relief that this kidding went well, no emergencies or disasters.  The other three ladies in waiting are on track so far, and hopefully all will go smoothly.  And Battie is doing much better.  I think the steroids we ended up treating her with made a big difference.  We still have to wait and see how she does, presuming that there is nothing left in her uterus that could become infected (she had a number of shots to keep her uterus expelling stuff).   I felt really bad for her today because she just wanted to get into the jug with Pippi and the new babies.  She is still calling to her babies when I milk her out in the eveninig, too.  Ah well, this too shall pass.  She cozies up to her baby from two years ago, Betsy, and it should be ok.  That’s life in the livestock fast lane!  And so it goes.

Battie update

Battie finally seems to be turning the corner toward feeling better.  I was really worried about her, she had so much trauma.  But the meds and the rest are catching up with her and she is seriously eating hay now.  I came out this morning to find her standing in her pen, cudding away nicely.  She is still a little depressed, and when I empty her udder, she nickers to her babies :*(

Eleganza and Edna

I think goats are worse in confinement even than sheep.  They are such herd animals that it is difficult for them to function without all that herd pressure, and without their friends and frenemies.  Battie has steadfastly refused to eat anything from the hay feeders in her pen, but instead chooses only to eat from the feeder she can reach right on the other side of the pen divider, particularly if another goat is eating from that very feeder.  So today we went out and while Sam was taking care of some other things, I let Battie out to stretch her legs and get the cobwebs out.  I would never have let her out of the pen without hanging there with her, because you just never know, and I wasn’t sure if she was going to be a little shaky.  She had a few tussles with Eleganza and Saffron, but other than that things went well (Battie is the Queen in Training.  Pippi, the Lamancha doe, is still definitely The Herd Queen).  It was hysterical, though, because when Eleganza got pretty stroppy with Battie, Pippi inserted herself between the two and grunt first at one, and then the other.  She gave them both the what-for!  I wish I could have gotten video of her doing that.  She is a tough task mistress and does not like misbehavior!  (Unless she is the one misbehaving).

And so we wait for whatever the weather will bring tonight… more damn snow, I guess.  I hope we are firmly in the lower amount zone, for once.  I am sorry to hear that other areas are getting slammed yet again.  Happy Spring!

A new month, a new week

Pizza dough (and a little wine for the baker!). Dough recipe from David Lebovitz

I can’t believe that it is March already!  I had a great first week working with my weaving mentor, and had a great weekend with our grandson.  We did fun stuff like make pizza dough, (I made red sauce), we read some Harry Potter, and he played lots of games.

Pippi the Lamancha doe, looking very wide and very ready to milk, indeed!

I am needing to get more organized for kidding, which should begin late in the week of the 19th.  A friend of ours had lambs two days ago and it has gotten me very excited about our impending babies.  It is the perfect time to give the pregnant does their Bo-Se shots (Selenium and Vitamin E), and I will be giving CD&T shots to each of them according to their due dates (3 weeks ahead, to make sure their babies have some immunities, particularly the Tetanus piece).  Since we live in a selenium-poor area of the country, the Bo-Se is very important and a few years ago I had begun boostering this twice a year in the moms.  I hope it’s making a difference.  We have not had any problems that I can ascribe to a lack of selenium, so hopefully it has.

Tesser sleeps very soundly in her little cat bed.

And so it goes.  Our little Tesser the Chihuahua is chugging along, getting very close to her 16th birthday.  She is doing well for her age and her size, and loves her little cat bed tunnel and her heating pad in front of the wood stove.

I can hardly wait for next weekend when we get Daylight Savings time back :*)

Pippi the grump

Yesterday dawned a beautiful day.  I am glad because it was hoof trimming Thursday!  The sun was out for the morning and it almost smelled like Spring.

I am sure I have written before about our wonderful shearer Emily.  We always had her shear the sheep when we had them, and as I have some issues with my back, she comes to us to do hooves every few months.  I don’t know what I would do without her!

Our sweet Twig

Our goatie girls have long memories (as does Jingle the donkey).  One or two of them hold grudges for quite awhile after we have someone like the vet out to see them.  Twig is actually the worst.  She wouldn’t talk to us or let us pet her for a few weeks after the vet did Rabies shots last fall.  She was seriously pissed with us.  The other one who has fits is Pippi, our Lamancha herd queen.

Pippi in a pout

When Pippi sees the vet or anyone she is not overly familiar with coming down the driveway, she tries to make herself scarce, running into the adjoining paddock and standing in the corner (you can’t see me here, right???).  All of our goats are extremely friendly, we have culled any that are difficult to handle, and mostly we have no problems corralling them.  Yesterday Pippi did her usual mad break for it, but when we got her on the milk stand, she would not eat the grain we had for her.  Instead, she just put her head down as low as she could get it, and stuck her tongue out at me.  I try not to anthropomorphize animals, but it just killed me to see her standing there giving me the stink eye, with her tongue sticking out like a child who has been caught being naughty!  She stamped and did her best to throw Emily off, but the humans prevailed.  Pippi wasted no time getting back into the paddock, and we all had a good laugh.

It was good to get the hooves taken care of before the girls get too big with babies.  A little over a month.  I am starting to get baby goat fever :*)

Nothing better than a good spreadsheet

Not sure what Pippi means by standing there with her tongue stuck out. Thinking hard about Reddog, perhaps!

When I pulled down the driveway Monday evening on my return from NY Sheep and Wool, I was greeted with the sound of Pippi absolutely bellowing her head off.   My son said that she had been at it all day, and had not really eaten while on the milk stand that morning, just kept trying to go over as close to the boys’ pen as she could get, and mooning about, bellowing.  As I don’t want kids too early in the season, I had been waiting until after the Rhinebeck trip to put the breeding group together.  And so I took the opportunity to get Pippi bred on Tuesday when we moved Twig, Peanut and Betsy to a separate paddock, and moved Reddog in with the 5 moms-to-be.  Jingle the donkey misbehaved badly with the non-breeding group, so we put her in with Hagrid and Fergus the wether.  (Donkeys hate change of any kind, and I think those young girls freaked her out.  She sees them through the fence every day, but she didn’t care for their company at all.  Ah well, it’s a donkey thing).

Reddog is quite the hunky boy!

And so Pippi was a happy camper all day Tuesday.  As it happens, by Wednesday morning it was clear that Saffron was having a good time with Reddog as well!  Now when I sit down at the milk stand in the morning I can have a full dose of buck stink up close and personal.  (Bucks who are courting a doe rub their heads anywhere they can on their intended – and that head has been drenched with all kinds of stinky hormone-filled pee.  Delightful to a doe, not so nice for humans!).

A new spreadsheet makes the coming breeding season seem a little more real!

And so my new spreadsheet has been inaugurated.  First babies due on Friday, March 23, 2018!

Pippi threw a curve ball

She did, too, in a number of ways.

New boy in town

Firstly, Pippi has never had a single, never ever.  Always pretty good sized twins, usually a buck and a doe (I wish I had a photo of her, pre-baby delivery.  She always looks like she has a suitcase on either side, and we uncharitably call her Wide Load.  Then she has her babies, and all is normal again).   Secondly, she always has had her babies during daylight, or at the very latest, early evening, right around dinner time.

Pippi can be a little bit of a helicopter mom!

Not this year!  Now we were pretty sure that Pippi was going to be popping her progeny yesterday, all the signs were good and she usually pops them out on her due date or one day later.  As the day wore on, however, I just figured that it might go another day.  But that’s not the kind of thing you don’t watch, so every few hours one of us went up and checked in on her.  I was exhausted, and after we tube-fed little Peanut a little before 10, we went out for another check.  Pippi was obviously in labor, talking to her butt, but the longer we stuck around, the less Pippi looked like she was going to cooperate (she is a very private doe and will cross her legs and wait until the humans are elsewhere).  By 10:10, we went in and I threw myself on the sofa.  Sam couldn’t wake me up at 11, which we had decided to target as the next check, but his text did, and it said Baby.

Our handsome boy!

So he got her and the baby into the jug, got her settled, and we took care of getting the weight (9.25 lbs.  Giant baby), giving the Bo-Se shot, dipping the navel, and helping to dry him off as he is one big piece of real estate.  Beautiful boy.  But her vaginal situation did not say to me, placenta, it said, there is more baby to come, and we waited to see if there would be another water bag.  Then I realized that she wouldn’t do anything while we were there, so back we went to the house after getting her a little molasses water, about midnight.

I guess I must have dozed off again, because about 1 we went out  and realized that she had passed the placenta, hence no more babies!  I don’t blame her, she certainly has a beautiful and very large baby, but it was a little bit of a surprise from a champion twinner!

At less than 24 hours old, he looks like he could just go and join the other babies and fit right in.  He is quite tall, and has a beautiful long body.  I must say that I am surprised the Lamancha genetics trumped the Guernsey genetics where the ears are concerned!

Anyhow, mother and baby are well, although Pippi gets incredibly pissed every time one of the other mothers looks into the pen.  But this is life, and when you are the Queen, I guess it is part of the job!

Our little Peanut

We are still trying to get Peanut on the bottle.  She had one shining moment today and got sucking her tongue, so I shoved the bottle in and she drank an ounce all on her own.  She looked very surprised, and then went to sleep.  One day at a time.  She has already become my little cuddle buddy.

 

Today

Our little orphan

Was quite the day.  We have been doing round-the-clock checks on a few of our does, and no one appeared to be doing anything yesterday or last night.  Getting bigger, but nothing else going on.

Peanut on her feet a few hours later

Last night we thought Beezus might be in the beginning stages of labor, so we were checking her every few hours.  Nothing.  But this morning when I went out there, I found a wee little babe covered in the straw near where Beezus sleeps.  There was no wet spot, no placenta, no nothing.  Just a little baby, apparently dead, lying in the straw bedding.  I grabbed her up, and even though I presumed she was dead, I wrapped her in my jacket and grabbed a towel, and ran her down to the house.  Beezus was just sitting there cudding.  Oy!

Anyhow, she mewled once, and as I was rubbing her belly, I felt her breathing.  And so it began.  After I took her temperature and it didn’t even register on the electronic thermometer, I knew we were in trouble.  And so I had to go to the trusty internet to read the instructions for giving an intra-peritoneal glucose and water shot.  I have never done this before, but luckily I had the glucose, and I did it, following the instructions from one of the big universities.  It was clearly A Miracle.  I watched her come to life in the minutes after that shot, and I still can hardly believe it.  When we got her temp up to 91.4, we celebrated, although when I spoke to the vet, she didn’t sound very optimistic about that milestone.  But we are keeping on, and hopefully it will be a positive outcome.  (Lots of hot water bottles, a heating pad, and body heat to help her get to a temp of 101+.  We did it around midday!).

Peanut having none of this bottle stuff!

Little Peanut Butter should not be alive, but as of tonight, she still is.  We worked long and hard this morning getting her warmed up, so that we could begin to give her some colostrum and milk.  I don’t have a lot of frozen colostrum, and her mama wasn’t making any.  She was dry as a bone.  So I defrosted some from another doe, and broke out my powdered colostrum.  I am milking one of my does, so I can mix that with the powdered stuff.

I don’t know where this will go, or whether or not this little one will survive.  She is truly a Peanut.  About as big as our chihuahua, who is 3 lbs soaking wet.  I want her to thrive, but the odds are against her.  We shall see.  We are having to tube feed her, even though since midday she has been able to hold her head up and get up on her feet and lurch around.  She is not interested in the bottle yet, but I am hoping against hope that we can coax her to it.  (I really hate tube feeding).

And so it goes.  Dorcas and Pippi are still ‘wide loads coming through,’ and very pregnant.  Don’t have a date on Dorcas, but Pippi’s due date is today, which means that tomorrow is a good bet for her.  She will be watched closely.  I can only hope that she decides to go during the day.  Beezus has actually been our only doe to do something at night so far.

Adventures in farming.  Always something new.  All positive thoughts are welcome!